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W.T. Stead/Ramsay MacDonald Correspondence

(1905)

R.Macdonald Esq., 3 Lincoln's Inn Fields,  March 22nd 1905

Dear Mr Macdonald

I shall be out of town tomorrow, but I shall see you on Saturday morning. I think it is important that we should have an authoritative statement from you on the General Election or policy in relation to Parliaments. Of course you will see a proof.

Yours Sincerely,

W.T. Stead


(March 23rd 1905)

Dear Mr. Stead,

I am in receipt of yours of the 22nd. Saturday, however, will not do for me, as I am out of town. What about Tuesday, the 20th?

I ought to say, however, that I am not sure that I can give you an authoritative statement on the General Election or our policy relating to Parliament. I do not think it advisable that that should be done at the present moment. When the time comes, you. may depend upon it, we shall be prepared to state our position, but I think it quite sufficient that our Party at the present moment should simply advance the claim that Labour experience and Socialist opinion working together should be represented in the House of Commons. There is a certain number of constituencies where such a combination is perfectly well understood and accepted and we confine our claims to representation to those constituencies. You may depend upon it that nobody and nothing are to hurry us into the development of our policy or in declarations regarding other Parties. We are in the best sense of the term an evolutionary party. I thought I had better say as much to you because you may not now consider an interview of any value.

With kindest regards,

Yours very sincerely,

J. Ramsay MacDonald


J.Ramsay MacDonald Esq., Victoria Mansions, 28 Victoria Street, March 24th. 1905.

Dear Mr MacDonald,

Yes, I think I had better see you anyhow. What time Tuesday, would the evening suit you as well as the morning, or if Tuesday evening would not suit you, what time Wednesday morning?

Yours Sincerely,

W.T. Stead


March 27th. 1905.

Dear Mr. Stead,

I am instructed by Mr. MacDonald to acknowledge your letter of the 24th inst., and to say that he could call at Mowbray House on Tuesday evening at 5 o'clock, if that hour is convenient for you. If it is, you need not write him further; if it is not, it would probably save time if you addressed him at 3, Lincoln's Inn Fields, W.C.


March 29th. 1905.

Dear Mr. Stead,

I have considered the conversation we had yesterday and will be glad to write for you a statement of the methods and purpose of our Committee in view of the coming election. You might let me know when you want the copy. I could let you have it soon if you could use it.

With kind regards,

J. Ramsay MacDonald


J.R. Macdonald Esq., April 12th. 1905.

Dear Sir,

I send you herewith the first number of the weekly publication "Coming Men on Coming Questions" to which you have been so good as to promise to contribute. If after looking over the list of Coming Men on Coming Questions, any suggestion occurs to you, as to either a Coming Man or a Coming Question, I should be very glad to hear from you.

I am,

Yours sincerely,

W.T. Stead


May 16. 1905.

Dear Mr MacDonald,

Thanks very much for your paper. Either call it "The Labour Party", or "The Independent Labour Party" or anything you like. Can you add to your kindness by sending me some particulars concerning yourself, that I can give your outlines in writing a preliminary sketch to introduce your paper?

Yours sincerely,

W.T. Stead